Theme 1 - Building the San Francisco State Identity

Theme Leads: President Wong, Davide Celoria

This theme will examine the essence of San Francisco State University and how that essence is reflected in our students, staff, faculty, and community. Key questions in this area include:

  • What values are central to SF State?
  • What binds SF State alumni to the institution?
  • Where can we improve the student experience?
  • Could athletics or other programming be enhanced in a way that would help facilitate ties to the university for our students, staff, faculty, alumni, and community?
  • What opportunities exist to better convey SF State’s identity to internal and external audiences?

Go to Theme 2 - Maximizing Student Success

Comments

I would like to see SFSU showcased in a number of fields, esp. Creative Arts and the academic programs, not just athletics. Often programs with a direct impact on the community are the only ones featured. They may be important, but I would hope that the university would also cultivate an image as a serious place of learning and the liberal arts.

Notes from the discussion of Theme 1 at the Academic Senate 9/17/2013:

 

-       How do we balance the need for a unified identity and all of the advantages that shared values bring (on the one hand) with the importance of providing a diversity of pathways for faculty and students and a liberal arts education that doesn’t stress “relevance” but rather a broad freedom for “exploration” (on the other hand)?

-       When the chairs’ council discussed what they would want in a new president, the chairs came up with a lot of ideas that should perhaps be recovered for discussion in the future.

-       On values, we all seem to resonate around social justice, and we all seem to think that distinguishes us as well. I think the best way to answer some of these questions is not in this kind of forum.  There need to be focus groups and surveys to understand, for example, what binds alumni to the institution.

-       As a student rep, agrees that students should be involved in the discussion. Social justice, shared governance, innovation are important, would like to stimulate school spirit (chant and song?) for example.  Stream-lining resources would be a good thing.   Re-open discussion on fee discounts for students on transportation.  Access to courses is important as well.

-       Not quite sure what q.4 (athletics) is asking.  Thinks the identity should come from some base.  People have already been archiving the historical identity – for example the San Francisco State strike.

-       As a marketing professor – A brand is not what YOU think it is, it’s what THEY think it is. In our case, THEY includes not just alumni but also the public, current students, faculty, and staff. We need to understand how these groups perceive state.

-       Representing staff on capital planning, supports improving the experience for the entire campus experience, but staff in particular are demoralized.   Fitting in with the social justice theme, and our motto “the experience teaches”, and WASC statements re: recognition of staff involvement, would like to emphasize role of staff: “how should a janitor’s experience working at state be different from anywhere else?”

-       A process piece regarding values: it seems to me that a starting point will be to reflect our individual values.

-       The way the questions are phrased right now are not extremely helpful.  We have three sets of questions, some ask what “is right now” and some ask to identify “what we should be”, and finally specific policy recommendations.  It would be more useful to have these in three different blocks.

-       In balancing the necessity of having academic senate input with the problems of free-for-all forums.  Why not take these questions back to the committees and consider them through these lenses of specific committees.

-       In looking at this list, obviously the bullet points are supposed to go together. At U of M, it would be obvious how athletics binds students to the U of M experience, and that is true at many such institutions.  At SF State, I’m not sure that athletics should go together with the institutional mission in the same ways.

-       To answer the first question (values central) I think of social justice and shared governance, but I also think that diversity (in many ways, including perspectives and experiences and goals) for students and faculty to not necessarily aspire to the same central, totally uniform goal.  We need a society that is “orderly disorderly”, conscientious self-reflective diversity.  We know what the differences are, understand where they come from, and value them.

-       In thinking about this and the values central to our campus, I would think our first is “educating” and also equity and fairness and social justice, global and responsible citizens (for faculty AND staff AND students), integrity, civic engagement, and paths to happiness.

-       One of our values is social justice and a voice for everyone.  Not sure if we can get everyone’s voice, but we should try to do so.

-       The value that I find to be central is collegiality, especially in a time of turmoil where it gets strained.  How do I think about my university and colleagues, and how do they feel about me.

-       Think about the past, present, and future… how are we going to shape the future, especially of what faculty and students we will have and how they represent a diversity of race, class, sexuality

-       His understanding is that we should be thinking about not only our own internal values but also aspirations for the future. Should reflect what we have been, who we are now, and where we’d like to go.  Would like to enter into the record that academic excellence, social justice, and cultural responsiveness are important values

-       Wanted to second what senator Strong said: equity and social justice resonate with him, and sees this as both an aspiration and (for some) an existing worldview.  We should all shoot for this.

-       Happy about having this conversation. This has been lacking to some degree over the past few years, not for bad reasons but because we are very pragmatic in our emphasis.  We need to point out we are a great value for money: students can get a great education for the money they invest, and we should remind alumni of this.

-       We know what our values are, what we need to think about is have we lost our way? Are we forgetting what our values are?  14 years ago, this was very much a teaching university.  We’ve gone through an incredible budget process on top of our neck, and in that process we may have lost some of what we wanted to see.  We need to bring these values back into focus rather than get new ones. [mentions athletics]

-       as a footnote: we do have a school song, which was uncovered when we celebrated our 100th year anniversary, and it’s actually very much ‘from another era’

-       What did you reflect on when you went to your first job interview that you took from your own institution?

1. We need more publicity about the university, faculty and students,eg. publicizing the success stories of the alumni and the faculty.
2. Try to change the image of all the high school counselors/advisers about SFSU. Many of them have negative image about the university. Tell them the University has changed; it is an up-and-coming university.
3. Having a good football team may help publicity and other high visibility programs may help.
4. Changing the name of SFSU back to California State University - San Francisco will enhance internationally the image of the university. Currently, some people in foreign countries confuse SFSU with San Francisco City College.
5. Tell the world about the values of the university and what the university is famous for.

What values are central to SF State?
What binds SF State alumni to the institution?
One of things that makes San Francisco State University so special is the laser focus placed on student experience and learning. I think the individualized attention that students receive from faculty at SFSU is unique and should be highlighted and celebrated. We should be proud of the level of mentoring we provide here. Without question, we rival any private institution in terms of the accessibility our students have to faculty and one-on-one support. That accessibility is a reflection of our core values and commitment to student success.

Alumni are so attached to this institution precisely because of the individualized attention they were given as students. They developed relationships here that were/are meaningful. They felt appreciated, cared for and nurtured as students. The bond is a personal one.

Could athletics or other programming be enhanced in a way that would help facilitate ties to the university for our students, staff, faculty, alumni, and community?

I don't think athletics is what defines the experience at SFSU. I also don't think more competitive athletics necessarily feeds into the core values our students and faculty generally have. I think we build community both here at SFSU and with the local population via our commitment to social justice and making a marked difference in the larger community in some way.

I see four potential objections to investing further/heavily into athletics:

1) The funds required to build a more competitive and expanded athletic program (regardless of the source), may be resented by the university community in light of the other budget issues and austerity measures that have been put in place over the past several years.

2) Much of the SFSU community prides itself in the fact that there *isn't* a football team. It is in fact part of the identity of the institution for many, reinforcing a core commitment to larger social issues.

3) Often competitive athletics programs introduce a sense of hierarchy into the university community. Special privileges are often afforded athletes in competitive programs. These special privileges and perceived hierarchy contrast negatively with the campus culture which promotes equality.

4) Finally, in light of current public outrage over corruption associated with competitive sports programs and the health risks now specifically associated with football, it may make it more difficulty to generate support for significant investment at this university.

I would like to see values of sustainability be more ingrained into the values and strategic vision of San Francisco State. These values are environmental stewardship, social justice, equity, collaboration, and holistic thinking. We are a public university in San Francisco. We as San Franciscans pride ourselves on being leaders in progressive thinking and envisioning a more just future. San Francisco State has done countless things under the umbrella of sustainability that should be celebrated but more can be done. As a student, I would like to see more institutional support for student led movements and organizations. This could come in many forms such as: committees that link students with the school, funding allocation, or paid student positions. We have a lot of passionate students on this campus and we need to work together to make sure we can accomplish as much as possible. Lets make care for the earth a core value of S.F. State and be a leader in institutional change for good!

As a newcomer, I've been impressed by the social justice mission and the desire to link it to all aspects of the community, be they academic, or part of outreach beyond campus. Finding that blend between academic rigor and social commitment is key. Please don't abandon this for a more generic, bland approach that one can find in so many other universities.

Central values: social justice, diversity, progressiveness, creativity.
Student experience: not just thinkers and critics, but creators and doers.
Community ties: we should live our nickname as "The City's University" by being a major partner on services and events for the whole city. For example, the performing arts center should be known as a major city venue, not just SF State's. And yes, a robust athletic program could help build this identity too.

As a former student and current employee of San Francisco State University, I have always seen a tremendous amount of diversity across the University campus (to be honest, it is hard not to recognize this). Clearly, a diverse population of students, staff and faculty is of great importance to the University's mission. This is a part of the SF State identity. Additionally, we have always placed a large emphasis on internationalizing the campus (both though our exchange programs and large number of international students seeking a degree from the University).

Over the past 20 years, the campus has developed into a more student-friendly campus (previously it was more commuter-based). We should continue to develop programming outside of the classroom. I think Welcome Days becomes more successful each year. Why is it that events to this magnitude only take place once a year?

On reviewing the new strategic plan for SFSU, I feel that a major issue that has been left out is Internationalism. As SF State students we are fortunate to be encompassed in such a global atmosphere. It's an increasing issue that our communities are becoming more and more global, many of our jobs will not take place domestically, and even if they are we will need in depth experience in dealing with coworkers from other cultures, or maybe even negotiating with foreign companies who cooperate with our domestic branch. Promoting and introducing internationalization to SF State students is vital to our future careers. As an International Business major, I knew that the only way to get a leg up in this career would be to study abroad, and I have done so quite a bit. Studying Abroad is ideal not only for personal development and maturity, but also for the opportunities that it can present, and the global contacts that can be made. Please review this new strategic plan and include internationalism!

Values Central to SF State: Community, Diversity, Academic Excellence, Innovation, Creativity, Student Involvement, Caring.

SF State Alumni to Institution: Legacy, Opportunity for change in their respective fields, Research, Outreach & Further Academic Progress Options.

Improve Student Experience: lower the housing cost if possible, emphasize and build upon campus life, expand the campus area if possible, unify the school with an athletic sport or an activity that everyone can take SF State pride in, more social gatherings, transparency between students, and CSU

The best and most important part of my education and collegiate identity was my study abroad experience. I got the opportunity to learn about not only myself but grow professionally and academically. Studying abroad is integral to every value that shapes SF State's identity as a valuable prestigious university. The promotional and representation of not only America, but more specifically SFSU abroad is important to convey SF State's identity both domestically and internationally. Studying abroad is fundamental to a successful, well-rounded collegiate atmosphere and should seriously be integrated into any San Francisco State plans now and in the future.

One of the main reasons I attended SFSU is because of its amazing study abroad program and large international student presence. I believe international exchange should continue to be a prominent part of future plans at SFSU. I studied abroad in Japan and SFSU made this dream possible for me. While abroad, I completed units to graduate and I networked with students from all over the world (including Mongolia, Taiwan, Australia, Norway, France, Morocco, and England), as well as met some truly inspirational professors at my school. When I returned one of the best ways for me to keep connected with the Japanese community and culture has been to meet students from Japan who are studying here. I hope that this valuable part of education is not lost: the opportunity to gain more knowledge, perspective and ability than interaction with only 5% of the world in the United States. These programs make students smarter, more competent, more open-minded, more social, and more able to succeed. Please do not ignore the international programs.

I am a current student at SFSU who formerly studied abroad through SF State study abroad (more specifically, the CSU International Programs). I believe, along with anyone else who has studied abroad, that this service, and the international factor at SF State, is priceless. SF State is well know for its degree of internationalization, and we both bring in and send out a huge amount of international students. It adds so much diversity to the campus to have international students studying here, and domestic students can learn so much from them. Studying abroad can really change a person's perspective, world view, and open their mind up. Students, especially in relatively affluent areas such as California, San Francisco especially, can get caught up in their daily lives and tune out what is happening in the rest of the world. This can make it difficult to relate to people with different lifestyles and problems, and can foster closed-mindedness. We must be constantly reminded of how big the world is and how many different kinds of opportunities there are out there to expand your horizons. The level of internationalization at SFSU is one of the most truly valuable things about this school, and about this city. It should be central in any future planning or strategic goal-setting.

The American Language Institute
SF State College of Extended Learning and International Affairs
Response to Strategic Plan Draft Fall 2013

The American Language Institute (ALI) is the intensive English program at SF State, on the main campus since 1961. Currently, ALI serves approximately 600 non-matriculated English learners per year, many of whom transfer to at SF State undergraduate and graduate programs. ALI also serves as a teaching laboratory for selected students in the MA-TESOL Program in the SF State English Department.

The ten members of the ALI permanent staff gathered on three occasions to discuss the 7 Strategic Planning Themes and wish to provide the following input to the Coordinating Committee:

Theme 1: Building the San Francisco State Identity
• Values we feel central to SF State include supporting a diverse, multicultural student population
including diverse socio-economic factors. SF State should be a campus where it is both safe to be one’s self and also be exposed to diverse points of view. The learning experience should be an informed mix of class learning and hands-on learning experience.

• Many SF State alumni are bound to the campus in one very important way: many of them work on
this campus and know and understand the student experience. Many alumni are connected through
pride in the achievements of colleagues and classmates.

• The campus experience could be improved in these ways:
1.Increasing course offerings and availability. Many students are frustrated after coming here and
learning they must wait to take certain core classes.
2.Decreasing the number of students in certain classes so that more students get more attention from their professors.

• Campus programming could be enhanced through greater advertising of campus sports, theater,
and art events in the community. It seems the city doesn’t always know about the programming on
campus. SF State would be a big draw if more conferences were held on campus.

As an example, the MA in TESOL program in the English Department could serve as an effective
marketing tool for the program if the community knew more about its bi-annual conference
through increased advertising. This would bring more students to the program.

• We feel it is crucial that the University President be seen frequently at social, civic, and artistic
events in the Bay Area to raise awareness of all the university’s offerings.

College of Extended Learning and International Affairs’ (CELIA) Leadership Team’s Responses to the Strategic Planning Coordinating Committee Themes

Theme 1 – Building the San Francisco State University Identity

What values are central to SF State?
 Serving the community (San Francisco)
 Diversity – SFSU reflects the Bay Area
 “The City’s University”
 Social justice
 Inclusion/opportunity (access)
 Affordability
 International component is central

What binds SF State alumni to the institution?
 Loyalty comes from generations
 SFSU gave them an opportunity
 Source of pride
 SFSU does not take advantage of its alumni base – e.g., only recently have alumni received letters

Where can we improve the student experience?
 Increase availability of classes
 More and improved facilities
 Commuter needs are lacking – campus is in transition

Could athletics or other programming be enhanced in a way that would help facilitate ties to the university for our students, staff, faculty, alumni, and community?
 It is expensive but it generates money
 Students would love it; promotes loyalty and student pride

What opportunities exist to better convey SF State’s identity to internal and external audiences?
 There are many opportunities – current identity is stagnant
 Rely on reputation rather than being innovative
 We don’t have a clear identity; the corporate world’s perception is that the academic quality is not uniform
 The University is the faculty; the staff don’t really count

FEEDBACK ON STRATEGIC PLAN THEMES
from Staff in Academic Resources, Faculty Affairs and
ProfessIonal Development and the Provost's Office

THEME 1Building the San Francisco State University Identity
Values:
1Staff are a “value” and would like to be appreciated/recognized (restore “Star of the Month,” service recognition awards, etc.).
2Internationalization (working in an internationally diverse community)--so much to learn and share; Multicultural work environment.
3Family-friendliness; community, collegiality
4Accessibility/Universal Access

Alumni:
1Communication to alums has become better in the past 5 years and should continue.
2Newsletters and events have helped bring alumni together.
3More outreach and more events. Events that are family friendly (time constraints with children).
4Reduce alumni membership fee.
5SF State Alum who are employees identify themselves more as staff than alums; how can this concept be improved?
6University Communications: SF State Magazine--great publication to let people know who we are, what we do, and our capabilities.
Athletics:
1Study whether athletics impacts alumni interest and/or student participation on campus and in community in general.
2It might benefit the University if it studied the athletic program, what it does, what it does not do, if investments in the programs are producing what we need to produce, and whether adjustments are in order.
Identity:
1Branding and banners City-wide is a good message: e.g. "SF State of Mind," "Creative Spark," etc. especially downtown and around DTC.
2Should alumni sponsor donations to public media fund drives (SF State Name recognition on KQED, etc.) It would be good PR, if the payoff is worth it.
3CEL: outreach/publicity/posters on transit, radio ads.

The value of global or international learning should be a priority. Questions should be asked 'What do we mean by global learning? What makes a student internationally or globally competent? What is global awareness?

Students need to be prepared to understand as much as possible the challenges that come with borders, languages, and policies. How to do this?

Academic Technology Staff Strategic Planning Notes
(compiled from four separate listening sessions held in October with all AT staff, facilitated by AVP Brian Beatty and AT Director Maggie Beers)

Question about the process:
Is this going to be a new mission statement? A strategic plan? What’s the outcome?

Theme 1: Building the SF State Identity

•An area for improving the SF State identify could be the SFSU web template. It has some technical issues and it limits the sites you can build. For example, websites with more three or more levels of navigation are not well supported. It could also be better at showing our branding and colors, since right now it is grey and white. There are improvements that could make it more friendly and appealing for departments and groups on campus to adopt. It was designed by six or seven people in collaboration with a contractor, many years ago (in web-time). The web and its capabilities were totally different then, it doesn’t reflect the university now nor does it meet the expectations of our larger community (students, donors, etc.).
•Some staff, but not all, said they would go to football games. Many expressed interest in going to baseball games. Many were surprised that SF State now had a hockey team.
•I would recommend a clearer and narrower mission so that we could identify what our core mission is. Our current mission conveys everything, which is ambitious.
•There is not really a strong sense that SF state is active in the community. It would be good to have our faculty weigh in on issues in the community. We have seen a Labor Studies faculty member commenting on the BART strike, but we don’t get asked for comment very much. We have lost several big faculty names who were a focus in the media.
•When we have tried to cultivate external entrepreneurial partnerships, one issue that has come up is resources and our ability to engage with local and national big name organizations. Partnerships need our help and our expertise. Many times there have not been the resources to support it, or we as a campus have not seen the value. This has caused us to pull away from these opportunities and not cultivate relationships with other campuses or community organizations. We have not been able to engage on cultivating digital collections, for example, because of resource issues.
•I’m an SF State alumni. After having had great professors semester after semester, especially in the biology department, you begin to feel like you are part of the community. After having seen faculty give above and beyond it seems natural to want to give back.
•Alumni like to feel professional connections and networking opportunities. We don’t support that real well at the university but it could keep us connected.
•Alumni lose access to email and the library. Some universities let the students keep their email as an alias (.edu) which can be helpful sometimes and doesn’t incur a cost.
•The university doesn't seem to have a coordinated social media strategy—there’s no rhyme or reason. Everyone does their own thing. There are separate Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube accounts and they aren’t at all connected with each other. We would have a lot more YouTube hits if we had a more cohesive networking presence and we linked to the SF State Facebook page.
•Values: That reminds me of the mission statement comment, it’s hard to nail down specific values since SF State seems to be everything to everyone. Maybe that is related to it being more of a commuter campus.
•When I hear SF State I think “multicultural” and support for women.
•Equity and Social Justice: I see those values in some of the conversations we have with faculty and students.
•It would be nice to see technology as a central value for the campus, given the location that we live in. To clarify, I’d like to see that SF State values the use of technology to extend academics and its other goals.
•SF State has many possibilities for engagement with technology companies. We need to have a strong sense of how technology could help us do the work that we do. A lot of other CSU campuses look to SF State for leadership in this area because of our proximity to Silicon Valley. SJSU is articulating that, but in their own way, and SF State has good opportunities too.
•The university should honor and support the staff member who is also an SF State alumni. Many times we are first generation degree earners as well and it would be good to have mentorship services available to help us move forward in our careers, especially if we choose to do them here at SF State.
•The university looks to alumni to give back in terms of money, but what about the staff members who are alumni? We work here for lower salaries and build a career here because of the loyalty we have to the campus. We give with our hearts and often could have earned higher salaries from industry jobs. It would be motivating to have our institutional knowledge valued.
•Part of the student experience is the everyday nuisances, such as trying to get cell reception in the library, getting to and from campus (Daly City shuttle), looking for Wifi on campus. In that area, every building needs improvement.
•When I was a matriculated student at SJSU I got a VTA pass for free. And here the best we have is a shuttle (that we have to wait for 30 minutes for sometimes) and a limited MUNI pass for the 28 between here and BART. SJSU and SF State are both commuter schools but it seems one values the student getting here more than the other!
•Would like a machine to sell muni tickets and passes near 19th Ave. The Student Union is too far away.
•We need a central clearing house and strategy for social media. It has to have a purpose and be connected to goals.
oAT can tell the stories of students to capture and share their academic experience through video. These life stories ultimately convey the SF State identity.
oFocus on alumni stories, invite them to share their stories, rather than only money.
oAT has supported University Advancement with their outreach to alumni groups and has helped them with BlackBoard Collaborate to host webinars.
•Branding is not what “we” think about SF State, it’s what “they” the public think about us.
oEvery day in the city there exists the “7 X 7” phenomena and it feels like it's a small town, everyone you come across has a connection to the campus.
oSF State has created the workforce of San Francisco. Alumni are everywhere and they look back fondly on their time here.
•Equity and social justice are core identities.
oThere is a new focus on certain athletics that have been proven to cause brain injuries (football), and that bothers many of us. It seems to go against the SF State identity of caring for our individuals.
oThe college of Ethnic Studies is a unique invention on this campus. Social justice makes us remember the strike and student rights--historical awareness around civil rights.
oStudents may not use the terms equity and social justice, but they will use other terms (e.g. community service).
•Football would be interesting, it might keep people on campus longer. It’s like a commuter college, they need something to keep them around.
•Athletics would be a big help for even alumni. When you have your sports team, you have stronger ties to the university. None of the sports apps to follow teams have SF State on them, although other CSU’s have a presence (Fresno, SDSU, Sac State even).
•The wrestling team is very good, but nobody knows about it.
•There is no one thing that everyone gets behind. More people might be interested in athletics.
•BECA has programs, like the campus broadcasting program. They could up their equipment and also have some concerts here to keep the kids on campus.
•There may be events here but there is not much advertising so it is hard to find out about them. For example, Rapper Bigboy from Outcast was on campus, but I only found out two weeks after. I would have gone if I had known about it.
•There are many concerts but many are done during the day.
•Maybe campus memo could make a better circulation to the students as well.
•There’s a problem with the way that the university is addressing social media.
oThere seems to be more of a fear of what students might say, and that shuts them out of participating. The YouTube channel is a great way to advertise what students are doing. The student population is so diverse, and AT can provide that central place to share student achievements. Small projects happening all over campus could be curated, connected to our campus Facebook page and that could bring better attention. It’s not a physical place, but it’s a virtual place.
•Doesn’t think the face of SF State is a sports team, a football team. It’s only a small portion of the students. People come here to do something different, not necessarily because of the sports.
•SF State has been able to be a different place to different people. Could we maintain some of the benefits of being a commuter school but also create more experiences for those living here? We don’t have to be one or the other.
•In covering events and in the PR campaigns, we talk about social justice. In many ways it is talked about as doing it ‘after’ we graduate. Or we will learn the ‘history’ of social justice and then apply it hopefully after.
•When you look at the numbers of students at Stanford, UC Berkeley—they wish they had the diversity we have. SF State is cosmopolitan; we have the diversity already. The fact that we have the opportunity to be here, that in and of itself is social justice.
•We have the honor of serving first generation college students. We have a very strong academic program across the board. We don’t have a reputation for our academics, how can we shift that perception issue?
•When you try to get a student perspective, SF State receives A++ for diversity on student message boards, because that diversity made the experience for them.
•Creative services could do a lot to support the SF State identity through the media pieces we create. The news presented on our SF State website is in small font, it’s beige, it’s not compelling.
•What happens now is that we make a video, then Communications writes an article and embeds a link, but the video is buried in the text. SDSU has a great online communications approach, they would have put the video first and then text secondary.
•We have 15,000 likers on Facebook, but only 200 subscribers on YouTube. We should push out a video to facebook, to the front page of the web, and YouTube.
•Engage our groundskeepers to show off their plants and their work. Have a botany app, take pictures, engage the students to build the app with the content provided by the groundskeepers.
•Video: we need more of it.
•Commencement needs to be put on YouTube
•The notion of continuing education has not been promoted. It’s all about “get them in, get them out.” The beauty of being here is being able to engage the community here in courses that we offer.
•CEL might offer opportunities, but it isn’t glaring from the home website. It doesn’t say, “I’m a life-long learner, click here.”
•The way that CEL is set up, the courses available there are more applicable to staff, but there isn’t a way to sign up for them without paying. Those courses make me better, make me better understand my community, they should be available.
•How do alumni feel about this campus? Alumni are tired of only getting pleas for money—a phone call or piece of mail once a month. It’s bothersome when it feels like the only reason the university is interested in you is to provide money.
•Keep the gator, I'm a proud gator. I like the mascot and the feel. Proud to be a gator.
•I have tremendous pride for BECA, my background. Have pride for SF State, but not necessarily the gator. The gator was a mistake. Have a great affinity for that bridge, but the gator doesn’t make sense.
•I get that the gator is a play with words, but we don’t have one. We don’t have gators.
•Who are we? Other than the mascot, who are we? From the student perspective, I looked at it as a blue-collar campus. As soon as 2, 3 or 4 o’clock happens it’s a ghost town because the students are at work. The gator is good because I’m a sports guy too-likes the idea of trying to rebuild the athletics here. There’s something to say about being blue-collar. Things aren’t given to us, we have to work for them. I was really proud to graduate after 7.5 years. It’s a people’s campus. It felt like anybody and everybody.
•It was very compelling to hear that only SF State and Stanford were awarded 10-years accreditation. What did we do that got the 10 year accreditation? That can form our identity. What are we doing right and how does that make us unique? We need to promote the fact that we got the 10-year accreditation, without rubbing it in - CCSF.
•UCSF is a medical school, what is SF State?
•SF State felt like so much a part of the city, it’s not like you’re going to a whole different world, you are still in the city. You just get off the streetcar and you are here, just like going to the Exploratorium at Fisherman's Wharf. Did you know you can take the streetcar to SFSU and go to the planetarium on campus? Did you know you could take a streetcar and watch the stars from Observatory at the top of Thorton Hall?
•Why don’t we have a central virtual location to be a part of SF State, to give a sense of contributing, where we can all come together and collaborate?
•Social media seems like noise, little bits of nothing. I wouldn’t go to social media to get info on events, I would go to the website and click on the link. Would want more than, “Dude talking in HSS at 6PM.”
•Events should be better advertised and then recorded and put on the web the next day. Campus events should be categorized by genre. The campus memo could really use a redesign—learn who the audience is, what they are looking for. Have the design students have a bash at it. Redesign the announcements and events pages.
•How do students find out about events? They don’t get CampusMemo, and they don’t read the student newspaper. How do we communicate event and other campus information to students? We know that students will come to online sites that mean something to them—look at how many log in to iLearn every day (>10,000)?-- but what attracts them (other than class assignments)? How can we get their attention?
•Our identity becomes administrative presentations. The website looks corporate. There is a high wall between students and administrators.
•Need to make it easy to find out how to use our resources, rent our rooms, and take advantage of our location.
•Create a landing page for students that they can go back to when they leave, so that they always know where to get their info.
•Subscribe to an events calendar—it could push it to your calendar and automatically populate it my calendar. Other sorts of events.
•Digital signage often does not say what the date is for the event they are promoting.
•Create one link on iLearn: “More ways to stay connected to SF State”
•Have a speakers series based on the Nobel prize winners, something timely, then make that the main video focus on our website. Make it relevant to whatever is happening now. Create op-eds on how we are relevant, based on current events, things happening at the time. (e.g. scientists focusing on the movie Gravity, Nobel Prize winners and how it relates to research happening at SF State).
•There’s a huge university communications wall—we need to tear that down to let the creativity come through.
•Students want us to fix the wifi, use cell phones in the library, check out cameras. It’s such a relief to be able to give students what we can.
•Create workshops, resources to help faculty and others get organized and create a solid teaching environment. Post these events online. Channel Islands started a YouTube site that leverages faculty to create their tutorials on best practices to share with others.

It seems rather absurd that SFSU should be located in the heart of a dynamic tech/software community, yet this connection seems to be completely ignored in its sense of identity. While many may feel that SFSU's identity lies in liberal and creative arts, social justice, and diversity, it is worth noting these areas are in no way inimical to these evolving technologies. One need not be a technological vanguardist to see that digital technologies should be an important part of the SFSU identity.

Statement on Strategic Planning from the Women and Gender Studies Department:

San Francisco State University has a long and impressive history as an academic and cultural center for our city and as an intellectual and activist catalyst for the nation. This history includes the leadership demonstrated by students, faculty and staff during the Third World Strike of 1968 and continues today through our community partnerships, student organizing, faculty innovations, alumni accomplishments, transnational connections, and the unique character of our campus body. As an institution and a community, we are at our strongest and our best when the administration honors the collective governance of students, staff and faculty. We urge the President and the strategic planning committee to build on these strengths.

A primary historic strength is our campus’s shared mission of social justice. When we reference SFSU’s commitment to “social justice” we are not satisfied with simple rhetorics of diversity, but insist upon a lively intellectual and political engagement with concepts such as citizenship, community, redistribution, equity, and identity. As scholars of women and gender studies, we understand social justice as a project steeped in histories of uneven power relations on local, national and global scales. We understand the importance of historical perspectives, coalitions, and collaborative, strategic decision-making in efforts to move institutions forward, even while under economic or political pressures. In the spirit of our campus mission of social justice and critical participation, the Women and Gender Studies Department offers the following observations and suggestions to the strategic planning effort.

While we understand the logic of dividing such an effort into seven themes, the intersecting issues among the themes required a single response to the critical issues facing our campus today.

Maximizing student success cannot be divorced from issues of institutional support and economic justice: the most pressing concern for our students’ ability to succeed is not only affordability or streamlining academic programs, but fostering the economic conditions that enable students to focus on their studies and not on their subsistence. Student success is not defined by the speed at which students can race through their studies, but by the quality of the education they experience while at SFSU. It is impossible for students to graduate in a timely manner when they are working 20-40 hours per week.

Instead of focusing on increasing philanthropic support we suggest focusing on increasing public support as an institution of public education. This would mean, to start, turning our focus to demanding increased state support; lobbying for increased student grants rather than loans; reducing tuition to levels previous to the budget crisis; and rethinking the full-time requirement for student scholarships and tuition waivers.

The Women and Gender Studies Department supports community partnerships that advocate for economic justice: these include campaigns to increase the minimum wage and to support immigrant rights. When wages are stagnant (locally, statewide, and on campus), students, staff, and faculty cannot excel educationally and professionally. We advocate for the working conditions of and professional respect for SFSU lecturers. We applaud the university’s commitment to undocumented students through its commitment to the DREAM Act and administrative and curricular support for all our students, documented and undocumented. We urge the university’s continuing advocacy for all of our students and the ongoing efforts on campus to make the pathways to both citizenship and residency meaningful by ensuring they are safe, accessible and affordable.

Similarly, the academic master plan is intimately tied to the achievement of our institutional goals and our impact on the community. Every day, SF State faculty, administrators, staff, alumni, and students are doing amazing work. We do not need to reinvent academic programs, but rather support and promote the outstanding work already being done at SF State. Community impact should be measured not only through “economic impact” and “morale” but also through the production of knowledge generated by the research and creative projects of faculty. The contributions of our alumni to their community are meaningful and substantial in not just fiscal terms but also non-monetary terms, including creative art, political leadership, community involvement, and engaged professional development.

Faculty research is crucial to the health of a university environment. After years of diminished resources and loss of CSU grants for research and professional development, faculty morale and student success would be improved not through superficial changes (such as the promotion of university songs or color days), but by the reinstallation of assigned time for research, the replacement of lost library books and cancelled scholarly journal subscriptions, smaller class sizes, and increased numbers of tenure-track faculty positions. Our students will succeed with excellent teachers who are professionally supported, not bureaucratically over-taxed, and when they can study and work in a physical environment which supports their studies, and when they receive consistent advising from faculty who are not working other jobs to pay their bills and keep their dependents afloat. Faculty professional activities are not simply the means by which to increase university “prestige,” but rather provide vital connections to intellectual, creative, cultural, and political projects that also makes SFSU faculty more inspired and inspiring teachers. The reshuffling of departments and programs in the recent past has neither saved money, nor served our students, nor increased the academic reputation of our institution. Creating conditions in which our outstanding faculty, students, and staff can do their jobs less encumbered by unnecessary obstructions will strengthen our university by facilitating the knowledge-production and cultural work of faculty and the quality education provided to our students. Such supports will undoubtedly positively impact our students’ success rates and the reputation of SFSU as an outstanding institution of higher education.

We are proud to be members of the SF State community and to carry its mission of social justice forward. In this commitment, we look forward to continuing to build our institution in partnership with President Wong, our students, the SF State alumni, and our colleagues.

Nan Alamilla Boyd, Professor
Deborah Cohler, Associate Professor and Chair
Julietta Hua, Associate Professor
AJ Jaimes Guerrero, Professor
Kasturi Ray, Assistant Professor
Jillian Sandell, Associate Professor
Evren Savci, Assistant Professor
Lisa Tresca, Office Manager

These comments come out of 4 brain storming sessions include Division staff as well as graduate students

I. Theme One: Building the SF State Identity

a) Current Positive Perceptions
• Inclusive of diversity: ethnicity, abilities, sexual orientation, queer, transgender, age, etc.
• Engaged, professors who work in the field (not just academic)
• Social activism, liberal, anti-establishment
• Affordable, accessible, convenient relative to other nearby universities
• Historical, groundbreaking in access for diversity
• Many international students
• Business and professional programs well-regarded within the CSU

b) Current Negative Perceptions
• In general, undergraduate perceived negatively (anyone can get in) and graduate programs tend to get lumped together with this negative perception, resulting in graduate degrees that are perceived as less valuable compared to other universities in the region
• Lower reputation, “state school” education “for the masses”
 Behind in standards in comparison to the UC system, USF, Stanford
 Students are less goal-oriented
 Lower graduation rates
 Employers more drawn to graduates of other Bay Area universities because SF State is not prestigious

Action Recommendations
SF State must capitalize on the positive perceptions and mitigate the negative perceptions by:
1. Maximizing graduate student success; recruitment, retention, graduation in 3-5 years; and
2. Branding and marketing Graduate Studies and graduate programs separately from undergraduate

EATERIES SHOULD BE LOCATED INSIDE EACH UNIVERSITY BUILDING TO BUILD SMALL COMMUNITIES. EATERIES SHOULD BE A PLACE TO GET TOGETHER WITH SIMILAR MAJOR STUDENTS. THESE SPREADOUT EATERIES LOCATED AROUND COLD CONCRETE AND CEMENT IS TOO COLD DISTANT HOWTILE ENVIRONMENT. STUDENTS NEEDS TO BE PROTECTED FROM INCLEMENT WEATHER, ONE CANNOT WAIT FOR WARM FOOD IN AN OUTSIDE WINDY AND COLD AREAS. SMALL COMMUNITIES LIKE HOME. LET'S WELCOME YOUNG FRESHMEN STUDENTS WITH A MORE WARM COZY ENVIRONMENT!

Could athletics or other programming be enhanced in a way that would help facilitate ties to the university for our students, staff, faculty, alumni, and community?

Commitment to San Francisco Youth

Alberto Olivares

Develop a community outreach program in coordination with the San Francisco Youth Baseball League, SFSU Athletic Department and SFSU Alumni Association to help generate interest for supporting positive youth development through youth baseball in San Francisco to reduce public school dropout rates.

http://news.yahoo.com/study-kids-less-fit-parents-were-165058043.html?so...

http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2013/07/11/study-finds-cutting-high-sch...

http://247wallst.com/special-report/2013/10/04/the-most-dangerous-states...

I would like SFSU to have a football team because I believe this can be a very strong source for providing an identity to our school. There will be much more publicity and school spirit, which means we will be able to actually create an identity. We will gain much support from parents and families. I know that the mood around the school will gradually change to a much more exciting environment. This can also be a great source of revenue for the school if the money is managed properly. I am also aware of what Title IX has done in 1995, but in reality our school has support for all athletes regardless of gender and should be fine with adding a Men's football team knowing that there is already support from both sides, male and female.

At our All-College meeting in the College of Ethnic Studies on December 10, 2013, faculty brainstormed in response to this theme. I submit the comments below on their behalf. Values are diversity/equity; social justice; community engagement; accessibility; quality public education; creative pedagogy; local/global in a public SFSU. Alumni are bound to SFSU in their commitment to public education, social justice, quality and experience of SFSU education, introduction to community and social justice and its affordability. Student experiences can be improved by better resources and classrooms, smaller classes and more classes, on-time graduation, and more on-campus community. Instead of athletics we might pool from our vast resources of San Francisco as a center for art and culture, because San Francisco as a city has compelling sports teams already. Our identity should focus around pressing and relevant issues in the city. Perhaps we can be more of political leader in the city in creating affordable housing and living.

Theme 1 – Building the San Francisco State Identity

Could athletics or other programming be enhanced in a way that would help facilitate ties to the university for our students, staff, faculty, alumni, and community?

Help San Francisco’s youth community develop positive learning through athletic activities.

Promote the University’s commitment to social justice by developing a community outreach program that affords the City’s youth the opportunity to participate in athletic programs that contribute to the physical, social, economic and academic health of the young student athlete. Let us support the initiative of reducing public school dropout rates by supporting positive youth development through youth sports in San Francisco.

“Sports has the power to change the world.”

“It has the power to inspire. It has the power to unite people in a way that little else does. Sports can create hope where once there was only despair. It is more powerful than government in breaking down racial barriers.”

“I have always believed that exercise is a key not only to physical health, but to peace of mind. Exercise dissipates tension, and tension is the enemy of serenity.”

Nelson Mandela

http://www.cnn.com/2013/12/05/world/africa/nelson-mandela-sports/index.h...

http://inplainsight.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/12/03/21631039-what-does-it-t...

Q#1: What Values are central to SF State?

·As Counselor Faculty members we are proud of the social justice mission of the university and believe that hiring and retaining staff and faculty of color that are bilingual/bicultural and reflect the diversity of the SF State student population (e.g. gender, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, religion, legal status, and disability) is crucial to this mission.
·Therefore it is important to improve the working conditions of faculty and staff by nurturing the physical, mental, and spiritual wellbeing of the faculty environment. A supportive working environment for faculty and staff is key to the success of faculty, staff, students and the overall campus community.

What binds SF State alumni to the institution?

Where can we improve the student experience?

·Our recommendation to improve the student experience is to address the educational inequities that exist among diverse student populations that do not have access to the same resources.
A specific example is AB540 and undocumented students on campus. If we have accepted AB540/undocumented students into the university it is our responsibility and our duty to ensure that they have equal access to an education and adequate resources such as funding, supportive faculty, staff, and peers that are informed about the challenges they face, mentorship, tutors, social spaces, and access to work. One solution is expanding counseling resources available to AB540/Undocumented students and making a deliberate effort to develop programming and outreach services that focus on this student population.
·In addition, students need to feel a sense of safety and security on the campus. SF State is rich in cultural diversity of the student population and make-up of the campus community. Our students often feel they experience microaggressions on a daily basis that result in experiences of oppression. Our recommendation is to address the racial climate in our classrooms, workplace, and overall campus. Develop social justice forums, programs, and further opportunities to have difficult dialogues on race and ethnicity. These spaces need to be made available to faculty, staff, and students to address racial and ethnic differences and the effect of microaggressions on our campus community on a daily basis.

Could athletics or other programming be enhanced in a way that would help facilitate ties to the university for our students, staff, faculty, alumni, and community?

What opportunities exist to better convey SF State’s identity to internal and external audiences.

Q#2

How you define student success?

·SF State Students have a right to a positive educational experience and good quality teaching.

What motivates students to stay at SF State?

·Students are successful and feel motivated when their financial, emotional, and physical needs are met.
· In order for students to be successful they need access to:
1) a reasonable and affordable education (e.g. reduced tuition, increase in financial resources-scholarships, grants),
2) courses necessary for graduation (often students graduation is delayed because of the inability to enroll in classes they need to graduate due to the lack of faculty to teach courses),
3) spaces that provide a sense of belonging (supportive campus staff, faculty, administrators, mentor programs, tutors, student organizations, peer education programs)
4) Increase in Mental Health Counseling resources to address the emotional concerns of students and promote student wellness and success. (Hire more cultural diverse counselors, increase number of sessions, provide a bigger space in order to provide adequate and culturally sensitive counseling services to a diverse student body).
5) Provide adequate advising and career services that nurture a student’s career path from the start of their college experience up to graduation/alumni.

What more can the university do to help students continue their education at SF State?

·The university can develop and expand career services and resources, such as hiring more career counselors.

What on campus resources would help students graduate sooner from SF State?

·SF State students would graduate sooner if they have access to a variety of methods of support on campus. For instance, prevention education is important to promote mental health wellness and self care of students. Programs such as the Suicide Prevention Regional Conference, Mental Health First Aid, How to HELP a friend: Creating a Campus Community of Caring –a peer suicide prevention workshop, alcohol and substance abuse prevention, sexual assault prevention, and other mental health related programs. These programs help students feel a sense of social connectedness and belonging.

Other than on campus resources, what would help students graduate sooner from SF State?

·Students would benefit for off campus resources for both physical and mental health.

What on campus resources are most helpful to you at SF State?

· Counseling & Psychological Services Center
· EOP
· Metro Academy
· AB540 Undocumented Student Task Force
· Disability Programs
· Financial Aid
· Student Success Program

CPSC Residential Life Counseling Program
Let’s Talk! drop-in consultation program
Project Connect
Project Rebound
Richard Oaks Multicultural Resource Center

Q#1: What Values are central to SF State?

·As Counselor Faculty members we are proud of the social justice mission of the university and believe that hiring and retaining staff and faculty of color that are bilingual/bicultural and reflect the diversity of the SF State student population (e.g. gender, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, religion, legal status, and disability) is crucial to this mission.
·Therefore it is important to improve the working conditions of faculty and staff by nurturing the physical, mental, and spiritual wellbeing of the faculty environment. A supportive working environment for faculty and staff is key to the success of faculty, staff, students and the overall campus community.

What binds SF State alumni to the institution?

Where can we improve the student experience?

·Our recommendation to improve the student experience is to address the educational inequities that exist among diverse student populations that do not have access to the same resources.
A specific example is AB540 and undocumented students on campus. If we have accepted AB540/undocumented students into the university it is our responsibility and our duty to ensure that they have equal access to an education and adequate resources such as funding, supportive faculty, staff, and peers that are informed about the challenges they face, mentorship, tutors, social spaces, and access to work. One solution is expanding counseling resources available to AB540/Undocumented students and making a deliberate effort to develop programming and outreach services that focus on this student population.
·In addition, students need to feel a sense of safety and security on the campus. SF State is rich in cultural diversity of the student population and make-up of the campus community. Our students often feel they experience microaggressions on a daily basis that result in experiences of oppression. Our recommendation is to address the racial climate in our classrooms, workplace, and overall campus. Develop social justice forums, programs, and further opportunities to have difficult dialogues on race and ethnicity. These spaces need to be made available to faculty, staff, and students to address racial and ethnic differences and the effect of microaggressions on our campus community on a daily basis.

Could athletics or other programming be enhanced in a way that would help facilitate ties to the university for our students, staff, faculty, alumni, and community?

What opportunities exist to better convey SF State’s identity to internal and external audiences.

Q#2

How you define student success?

·SF State Students have a right to a positive educational experience and good quality teaching.

What motivates students to stay at SF State?

·Students are successful and feel motivated when their financial, emotional, and physical needs are met.
· In order for students to be successful they need access to:
1) a reasonable and affordable education (e.g. reduced tuition, increase in financial resources-scholarships, grants),
2) courses necessary for graduation (often students graduation is delayed because of the inability to enroll in classes they need to graduate due to the lack of faculty to teach courses),
3) spaces that provide a sense of belonging (supportive campus staff, faculty, administrators, mentor programs, tutors, student organizations, peer education programs)
4) Increase in Mental Health Counseling resources to address the emotional concerns of students and promote student wellness and success. (Hire more cultural diverse counselors, increase number of sessions, provide a bigger space in order to provide adequate and culturally sensitive counseling services to a diverse student body).
5) Provide adequate advising and career services that nurture a student’s career path from the start of their college experience up to graduation/alumni.

What more can the university do to help students continue their education at SF State?

·The university can develop and expand career services and resources, such as hiring more career counselors.

What on campus resources would help students graduate sooner from SF State?

·SF State students would graduate sooner if they have access to a variety of methods of support on campus. For instance, prevention education is important to promote mental health wellness and self care of students. Programs such as the Suicide Prevention Regional Conference, Mental Health First Aid, How to HELP a friend: Creating a Campus Community of Caring –a peer suicide prevention workshop, alcohol and substance abuse prevention, sexual assault prevention, and other mental health related programs. These programs help students feel a sense of social connectedness and belonging.

Other than on campus resources, what would help students graduate sooner from SF State?

·Students would benefit for off campus resources for both physical and mental health.

What on campus resources are most helpful to you at SF State?

· Counseling & Psychological Services Center
· EOP
· Metro Academy
· AB540 Undocumented Student Task Force
· Disability Programs
· Financial Aid
· Student Success Program

CPSC Residential Life Counseling Program
Let’s Talk! drop-in consultation program
Project Connect
Project Rebound
Richard Oaks Multicultural Resource Center

Collective of CPSC developed comments.
Q#1: What Values are central to SF State?

· As Counselor Faculty members we are proud of the social justice mission of the university and believe that hiring and retaining staff and faculty of color that are bilingual/bicultural and reflect the diversity of the SF State student population (e.g. gender, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, religion, legal status, and disability) is crucial to this mission.
· Therefore it is important to improve the working conditions of faculty and staff by nurturing the physical, mental, and spiritual wellbeing of the faculty environment. A supportive working environment for faculty and staff is key to the success of faculty, staff, students and the overall campus community.

What binds SF State alumni to the institution?

Where can we improve the student experience?

· Our recommendation to improve the student experience is to address the educational inequities that exist among diverse student populations that do not have access to the same resources.
A specific example is AB540 and undocumented students on campus. If we have accepted AB540/undocumented students into the university it is our responsibility and our duty to ensure that they have equal access to an education and adequate resources such as funding, supportive faculty, staff, and peers that are informed about the challenges they face, mentorship, tutors, social spaces, and access to work. One solution is expanding counseling resources available to AB540/Undocumented students and making a deliberate effort to develop programming and outreach services that focus on this student population.
· In addition, students need to feel a sense of safety and security on the campus. SF State is rich in cultural diversity of the student population and make-up of the campus community. Our students often feel they experience microaggressions on a daily basis that result in experiences of oppression. Our recommendation is to address the racial climate in our classrooms, workplace, and overall campus. Develop social justice forums, programs, and further opportunities to have difficult dialogues on race and ethnicity. These spaces need to be made available to faculty, staff, and students to address racial and ethnic differences and the effect of microaggressions on our campus community on a daily basis.

Collective of CPSC developed comments.
Q#1: What Values are central to SF State?

· As Counselor Faculty members we are proud of the social justice mission of the university and believe that hiring and retaining staff and faculty of color that are bilingual/bicultural and reflect the diversity of the SF State student population (e.g. gender, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, religion, legal status, and disability) is crucial to this mission.
· Therefore it is important to improve the working conditions of faculty and staff by nurturing the physical, mental, and spiritual wellbeing of the faculty environment. A supportive working environment for faculty and staff is key to the success of faculty, staff, students and the overall campus community.

What binds SF State alumni to the institution?

Where can we improve the student experience?

· Our recommendation to improve the student experience is to address the educational inequities that exist among diverse student populations that do not have access to the same resources.
A specific example is AB540 and undocumented students on campus. If we have accepted AB540/undocumented students into the university it is our responsibility and our duty to ensure that they have equal access to an education and adequate resources such as funding, supportive faculty, staff, and peers that are informed about the challenges they face, mentorship, tutors, social spaces, and access to work. One solution is expanding counseling resources available to AB540/Undocumented students and making a deliberate effort to develop programming and outreach services that focus on this student population.
· In addition, students need to feel a sense of safety and security on the campus. SF State is rich in cultural diversity of the student population and make-up of the campus community. Our students often feel they experience microaggressions on a daily basis that result in experiences of oppression. Our recommendation is to address the racial climate in our classrooms, workplace, and overall campus. Develop social justice forums, programs, and further opportunities to have difficult dialogues on race and ethnicity. These spaces need to be made available to faculty, staff, and students to address racial and ethnic differences and the effect of microaggressions on our campus community on a daily basis.

Maximize student success is important. I think by giving them a new gym facilities to keep them healthy to study. Also creating a facilities where the dorms are located near Housing to network, socialize and study. If open after 7:00pm than security will be needed to keep campus safe from visitors off campus.

Diversity, equity, social justice and universal access, are important values we find central to SF State. We think quality education, better career services and providing Alumni with reunion opportunities are the key components that binds SF State alumni to our institution.We believe having better facilities, increasing the number of classes and updating the career center would improve the experience of students at SF State. –Posted by DPRC employee on behalf of DPRC

What values are central to SF State?
Good climate and the diversity of the student population are the things that are valued, or should be valued.

What binds SF State alumni to the institution?
Nothing binds the Alumni to this campus. Probably because we don't make their learning experience a successful and happy one AND we really do not go out of our way to provide services to our Alumni

Where can we improve the student experience?
Focus on helping the students succeed in their choice of major, no matter what it is. The university needs to put the Student Success Center at the top of their 'To Do' list and get the academic departments and financial backers on board.

Could athletics or other programming be enhanced in a way that would help facilitate ties to the university for our students, staff, faculty, alumni, and community?
I think the NCAA 'athletics' is a HUGE waste of money. It serves only a small elite portion of the student population, while Campus Recreation, which serves ALL students, regardless of their skill level struggles to get funding.

What opportunities exist to better convey SF State’s identity to internal and external audiences?
Internal: Students...if we listen to them
External: ICCE, Alumni Services, EOP, OIP,

The central value to SF State is that it is a secure place for studying.

Statement from the All-University Committee on International Programs (AUCIP)

The All-University Committee on International Programs (AUCIP) is an Academic Senate committee whose membership is drawn from all colleges and various administrative units of San Francisco State University (SF State). Its primary charge is to carry out the university’s strategic goal of internationalization (CUSP II, Goal IV).

In response to your call for input on the university strategic planning process, we at the AUCIP would like to present this statement on what we view should be an important focus of the strategic plan for the next few years. The AUCIP would like to maintain internationalization as one of the major goals of the university’s new strategic plan.

International education and fostering multicultural understanding are integral components of liberal education. Integrating global content into the curriculum is thus essential. In its 113 year history, San Francisco State University has aspired to prepare students to become active and ethical citizens who uphold global perspectives in their respective disciplines and fields of practice.

By keeping internationalization as one of the major goals of the new strategic plan, we expect to see the university carry on with its commitment to:

• Keep the educational and social justice priority and spirit of study abroad in mind when developing funding, research, teaching, and project-oriented options for SF State/CSU study abroad and faculty-led study-abroad options;

• Provide on-going support for international students;

• Support faculty in pursuing international research and scholarship opportunities so that all faculty have a reasonable and equitable opportunity to develop and complete them

• Support students by providing reasonable and equitable financial assistance to facilitate their participation in research, teaching, and project-oriented SF State/CSU study abroad and faculty-led study-abroad opportunities designed to enhance their education and international experience;

• Incentivize faculty to internationalize the curriculum, and

• Assist staff in implementing campus policies, procedures, practices, and priorities to ensure support for internationalization.

The university has a proven track record of supporting the internationalization of the campus and curriculum at the highest levels. As a result, SF State has received the following recognition and awards from reputable institutions of international education for its internationalization efforts:

• Recipient of the Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarships for 12 SF State students to help fund their study abroad programs for Spring 2014.

• Recognized by the Chronicle of Higher Education, October 2013 issue, as one of the nation’s top universities for successful applicants to the Fulbright U.S. Student Program.

• Recognized as among the top 20 master's-level institutions for the number of faculty and staff who earned prestigious Fulbright scholarships in 2012-13.

• Recipient 2012 of the Senator Paul Simon Award for Campus Internationalization.

• Recognition from the Chronicle of Higher Education, November 2, 2012 issues as one of the nation's top producers of Fulbright Scholars.

We hope that, through the new strategic plan, the university will continue to affirm its commitment to make international education and experiences available to its diverse student body and campus community.

We appreciate the opportunity to forward this statement to the Strategic Plan Coordinating Committee. Thank you very much.

AUCIP 2013-2014
Melissa Camacho (BECA), AUCIP Chair
Josephine Arce (Secondary Education), At-large Representative
Maziar Behrooz (History), Academic Senate Liaison
Ali Borjian (Secondary Education), Graduate College of Education Rep
Mehmet Ergul (Hospitality), At-large Representative
Jose Galván (CELIA), Academic Affairs
Hildy Heath (Director, OIP), International Programs
Jocelyn Hermoso (Social Work), CSU-ACIP Faculty Representative
Ann Koch (Management), College of Business Representative
Pavlίn Látková (Recreation, Parks, & Tourism), CHSS Representative
Wenshen Pong (Engineering), College of Science & Engineering Rep
Johnetta Richards (Africana Studies), College of Ethnic Studies Rep

Office of International Programs

Comments to the Strategic Planning Coordinating Committee
October 2013

To produce globally competent college graduates who can be wise stewards of the world they inherit after leaving the university, institutions must put international understanding and intercultural competence at the heart of the educational experience, unambiguously infused throughout all aspects of the university. To fail to do so is to provide a second-rate education.

The San Francisco State University campus has come to consensus on this priority as evidenced by two strategic plans, CUSP I and CUSP II. It is crucial that a corresponding focus be present in the new strategic plan.

Twelve Years of Strategic Planning
International education and international competencies for students have been identified among the university’s top priorities for the past twelve years. In 1997, CUSP I identified “Our Internationalized Curriculum” as one of six defining characteristics of a San Francisco State education, specifically calling for increasing students’ command of international perspectives and second language proficiency, and stating that San Francisco State seeks to become a model of international education by means of the following strategic objectives:
• SF State should encourage all departments to internationalize their curricular offerings and should focus on specific curricular areas to internationalize, especially in professional fields.
• SF State should increase the opportunities to take upper division courses with international perspectives as part of their baccalaureate degree requirements.

In 2005, CUSP II reiterated and strengthened these strategic objectives in Goal IV – International Development:
• SF State infuses international content into its curriculum.
• SF State promotes study abroad for students and international exchange for faculty as priorities for internationalization.
• SF State engages international students and scholars as important resources for campus internationalization.
• SF State ensures campus-wide support of internationalization at all levels of the institution.

National Recognition
For the past twelve years, these objectives have driven the international work of the university and ensured that the internationalization effort has been conceptualized as a curricular and academic endeavor in keeping with the thinking of national leaders in the field.
Over 300 general education courses with international content provide essential international knowledge and skills. Graduation requirements ensure that every student takes at least one course with a Global Perspectives designation. SF State ranks second in the nation among Master’s granting institutions for sending students abroad on long-term programs (semester or academic year) to obtain first-hand international experience, third in the nation among all categories for long-term study abroad, and is consistently number one in the CSU system. Over 2,000 international students and scholars attend SF State, contributing their perspectives to our classrooms and the community at large.

SF State has fulfilled the goal to become a model of international education. Our efforts were singled out for national recognition last year when the campus was honored as a recipient of the 2012 Senator Paul Simon Award for Campus Internationalization.

Rare Opportunity
We have achieved much success but our work is not done. The university is now undergoing a campus wide discussion of a new strategic plan that will drive that work and place a defining mark on the San Francisco State education for many years to come. It is vital that the campus not miss this opportunity to maintain internationalization as an SF State core value that gives definition and distinction to the university.

Proposed for Discussion
International education equips students with knowledge of the diverse peoples, governments, histories, and natural systems that comprise the world, and the forces that to continue to shape them. It produces graduates who respect the many groups that make up a global society and who are prepared to meet the challenges of an interdependent world.

SF State creates and sustains a campus where through the curriculum, through interaction with international students and faculty, through direct international experience in study abroad, and through campus wide activities:

• Students will recognize that one’s view of the world is not universally shared and that others may have profoundly different perspectives;

• Students will recognize that the world’s systems are interdependent and that local economic and social patterns and actions have global impact beyond their effects on individual lives;

• Students will understand that behavior of individuals, groups, and nations affects others in terms of human rights and economic well being, both in the U.S. and in the world outside the U.S.;

• Students will understand that behavior of individuals, groups, and nations will help or hinder future generations’ abilities to meet their own needs, both in and out of the U.S.